The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

Cover of The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society. Art of vintage letters wrapped in a ribbow by Christian Raoul Skrein von Bumbala.
Art by Christian Raoul Skrein von Bumbala. Click to read an excerpt!

Title: The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

Author: Mary Ann Schaffer

Nutshell: World War Two is over, and for Juliet Ashton, sometime writer of a war humour column, so is the Muse of Comedy. Juliet is sick of making fun of war, and ready to write something completely new. As she tours England, two unexpected things happen. The first is that a rich, handsome man begins to court her. The second is that she recieves a letter from one Dawsey Adams, inhabitant of the Island of Guernsey in the English Channel, who owns a book that used to be hers. It’s collected writings of Charles Lamb, and he adores them and wonders if she might know of a place where he could acquire more?

Juliet, intrigued, has her favorite bookseller hunt down a volume which she sends with her reply, asking about his literary passions. He explains that he is a member of the Society given by the title of the book, which came about during the war in order to prevent their being arrested by Germans, and that only serves to fascinate her more. How could a literary society prevent arrest? Wherefore the Potato Peel Pie? And so she begins to correspond with the members of the Society, discovering the extraordinary story of one community’s occupation by Germans in WWII, and their reconstruction.

Readalikes: I have not read much WWII fiction since my girlhood. If you wish to delve deeper into the experiences of those caught in the Holocaust, The Hiding Place and Number the Stars are two excellemt choices. For those wanting more historical fiction in this style, Sorcery and Cecelia and sequals are also told through correspondence. The characters and narrative story are rather like Dorothy Sayers, without the mystery aspect.

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The Cobra Trilogy

Cover of Cobra Trilogy by Timothy Zahn. Art by Kurt Miller.
Art by Kurt Miller. Click to read a preview!

Title: The Cobra Trilogy (Cobra, Cobra Strike, Cobra Bargain)

Author: Timothy Zahn

Nutshell: The Cobra Trilogy covers three generations of  super-soldier. In the first book, small town boy Johnny Moreau wants to change the odds in the war against an alien menace to the Human worlds. He undergoes surgery to become a super-soldier, with servo-assisted, ceramically strengthened muscles and bones, built in lasers, and an implanted computer loaded with an acrobatic skill set to help drive them. He fights the war with the Trofts, and then afterwards deals with the political ramifications of a segment of the population having been turned into un-retireable weapons.

In the second book, Jonny’s twin sons Joshua and Justin impersonate each other on a covert mission. A planet populated by humans has been discovered far from human-controlled space, but intel suggests they are hostile. The inhabitants don’t seem hostile at first. In fact, they seem unnervingly peaceful. Unsettlingly peaceful.  And a strange bird explorers find on a different planet may hold the key to getting back home safely.

In the third book, Justin’s daughter Jessica is made the first female Cobra and sent to surveil the formerly suspicious planet, but she is unexpectedly shot down. Somehow, as an obvious offworlder in potentially hostile territory, she  must escape the planet. Od course, she thinks she’ll be able to complete her mission on the way.

Read-alikes: Michael A. Stackpole and Jerry Pournelle both write similar planet-based military SF.Read More »

Top Ten: I Jedi

Cover of I, Jedi by Michael A. Stackpole. Artwork by Drew Struzan.
Artwork by Drew Struzan. Click to read a preview!

Title: I, Jedi

Author: Michael A. Stockpile

Nutshell: Corran Horn’s wife has been kidnapped. Ordinarily he would go rushing off after her, swoop in to her rescue, and they would kick rear end and take names all the way out of the enemy base. But Corran doesn’t know who kidnapped Mirax or where to find them. The galaxy is a huge place, and only a few New Republic intelligence officers know where she was before she was kidnapped. That information is highly classified, of course.

In addition, there’s some evidence that Mirax was kidnapped by someone who thought she was associated with the Jedi. Which means it might take a Jedi to rescue her.

So Corran joins Luke’s Jedi academy, to connect with the Force and his Jedi heritage. But soon he discovers that being Luke Skywalker isn’t his destiny. If he’s going to save Mirax, he’s going to have to be a Jedi on his own terms.

Read-alikes: Just about any other Star Wars book is like this one, especially the X-wings series. I also think Timothy Zahn’s Night Train to Rigel and series is similar.Read More »